UAS

Medical Unmanned Aerial System Service Integration thesis is online. by Joseph Phillips

Thesis title: Medical Unmanned Aerial System for Organ Transplant Delivery

  • DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.17477.29928

II published this on ResearchGate. Without resources, I have no way of pursuing the project, so I am sharing in the hope that someone cares. About two dozen people die every day in the US waiting for organ transplants. I found issue with logistics and costs associated with organ transplants, so I devised a service which could absorb healthcare costs and saves lives. That is my mission.

When I bring up automation, people often conjure the idea of an anthropomorphic machine putting slippers on lazy feet, walking around and acting like a person and doing menial tasks. My idea of automation is the performance of tasks at inhuman intervals, or inhuman environments, machines that do things we cannot do, not things we can do. So, I take umbrage with people who insist I focus on problems already solved, on tasks we could pay people to do. Engineering, to me, represents a realm of invention for inhuman solution. People cannot hover in the air nor can we move through the air with the precision of a piped fluid, but a drone can. Airplanes swoop and flare. Drones hover. Instead of a world of curves, the drone has curves and sharp angles, just like my ginormous thesis.

I felt strange about pursuing this research. It navigates robotics, UAS technology, and put me in touch with the harsh realities of funding opportunities in the US. How can a couple of people working together in a garage change the world? Walt Whitman and Samuel Coleridge, Bill Gates and Paul Allen. It’s asymmetric and unintuitive to believe that it happens all the time. That Westinghouse and Tesla happened. That Orville and Wilbur Wright happened. That, indeed, it is the only thing that ever happens. People get together and share resources and the permutations shake the firmament. I am hoping I can partner up with a couple of people who share my passion and vision of sustainable medical drone services.

Joined an Experimental Aircraft Association chapter to entertain awkward conversations about drone integration by Joseph Phillips

If I want to see why drones are bad for airports, I need to talk with pilots. It is not comfortable for me, but the conversation has to start locally if it is to have any impact. I know I am on their turf and going to be ridiculed often, so, for all you drone pilots out there who want to learn from my mistakes and missteps…

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